The End Has No End

February 8, 2009

I’ve fell asleep trying to read these stupid text-books called Art Since 1900 for this class.  Strangely enough, these books with color, pictures of the paintings by artists, and nifty little reading tools in it is by far more boring that the other book that’s three inches thick that could probably stop a bullet, and full of text with readings by artists themselves about art theory.  Here is an example of why it takes me forever to go through the assigned reading from the shitty Art Since 1900 books:

One could even say that, with the opening in New York of collector A.E. Gallatin’s Museum of Living Art in 1926, that of the Museum of Modern Art in 1929, and that of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (then called the Museum of Non-Objective Painting) in 1939—not to forget the multiple touring exhibitions of the collection (selected by Marcel Duchamp) of Katherine Dreier’s Societe Anonyme in the twenties and thirties, and last but not least the militant activity of Peggy Guggenheim at her “Art of This Century” gallery, again in New York, from 1942 on—the Abstract Expressionists had, by the early forties, accumulated a better first-hand knowledge of their immediate European predecessors than any other contemporary artists (and certainly better than anyone in Europe).

I’m not sure if you noticed, but that was all ONE sentence.  Sure it seems easy to read through now.  But I spent 5 minutes reading and re-reading that, trying to figure out in simple terms what it’s saying, and they could have just said:  “The Abstract Expressionists had accumulated a better first-hand knowledge of their immediate European predecessors than any other contemporary artists.”  And it really wears you out when the rest of the books are written like this.  I hate these pretentious turd cakes who use an equal amount of punctuation marks as they do words.

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